Opening in April | Paul Kasmin Gallery 

Barry Flanagan: The Hare is Metaphor

515 West 27th Street
April 19 – June 9, 2018

Opening Reception: 
Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 6 – 8 pm

Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of sculpture by Barry Flanagan. The presentation, on view between April - June, 2018, will bring together a selection of the artist’s iconic bronze hares from the 1980s - 1990s alongside his lesser-known works made with rope, sand, cloth, stone, ceramics and light as a sculptural component (largely from the 1960s - 70s). A series of small paper collages, drawings, prints and film will also be included.

The exhibition, curated by Dr Jo Melvin, offers new insights into the interconnectedness of seemingly distinct periods of Flanagan’s 40-year career, demonstrating an ongoing experimentation with materials and their properties and a symbiosis between abstraction and figuration. It challenges the supposition that Flanagan’s later works represent a marked shift in the artist’s approach to art-making. Rather, they represent the distillation of Flanagan’s decades-long fascination with ontology, movement and the physicality of the various materials with which he worked.

 Barry Flanagan, Untitled, 1979, hessian, plaster and acrylic, 35 3/8 x 29 1/2 inches, 90 x 75 cm. © (1979) Barry Flanagan. Courtesy of Waddington Galleries. Barry Flanagan, "Juggler," 1994, bronze, 87 1/2 x 37 3/4 x 26 1/2 inches, 222.3 x 95.9 x 67.3 cm. Edition of 8 + 3 APs (#2/8.) © (1994) Barry Flanagan. Courtesy of Waddington Galleries.

Barry Flanagan, Untitled, 1979, hessian, plaster and acrylic, 35 3/8 x 29 1/2 inches, 90 x 75 cm. © (1979) Barry Flanagan. Courtesy of Waddington Galleries. Barry Flanagan, "Juggler," 1994, bronze, 87 1/2 x 37 3/4 x 26 1/2 inches, 222.3 x 95.9 x 67.3 cm. Edition of 8 + 3 APs (#2/8.) © (1994) Barry Flanagan. Courtesy of Waddington Galleries.

Elliott Puckette: New Paintings


297 Tenth Avenue
April 19 – June 9, 2018


Opening Reception: Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 6 – 8 pm

Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Elliott Puckette, her eighth solo exhibition at the gallery. With this body of work, the artist challenges herself to push her use of line by first translating it into three dimensions, making ephemeral sculptures out of wire.
 
The wire forms are the springboards for the paintings. Made quickly, and deliberately without excessive control, their unpredictable form nods to the automatism of late Abstract Expressionism. Puckette documents the silhouettes of the layered, criss-crossing maquettes by etching into a picture plane prepared with gesso and kaolin and washed with ink. This labor-intensive process is a method by which to slow the line: to subtract it from the painting rather than introduce it as an addition, and the translation of the wire sculpture into painting foregrounds the line’s dynamic potential.

 Elliott Puckette, "A Love Letter," 2018, gesso, kaolin and ink on dibond, 72 x 180 inches, 182.9 x 457.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery. Photo by Diego Flores.

Elliott Puckette, "A Love Letter," 2018, gesso, kaolin and ink on dibond, 72 x 180 inches, 182.9 x 457.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery. Photo by Diego Flores.

Jane Freilicher: 50's New York


293 Tenth Avenue
April 18 – June 9, 2018


Opening Reception: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 from 6 – 8 pm

Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce its debut exhibition of paintings by Jane Freilicher (1924 - 2014), whose estate the gallery now represents. The presentation is the first to focus on Freilicher’s paintings from the 1950s; a body of work that critic Fairfield Porter termed “traditional and radical.” It will include early still lifes, portraits nd the studio views that elucidate her characteristically deft balance of interior and exterior. Hailing from the 1950s and painted within various studios in lower Manhattan, the works are evocative of a downtown milieu that has since come to represent the period’s golden age of spirited, improvisational artistic freedom. They  articulate Freilicher’s enduring influence: her steadfast observation and intuitive realism are detectable within the work of a number of painters working today.

 Jane Freilicher, Still Life (Persian carpet), 1955, oil on linen, 40 x 36 inches, 101.6 x 91.4 cm. Courtesy the estate of Jane Freilicher and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Jane Freilicher, Still Life (Persian carpet), 1955, oil on linen, 40 x 36 inches, 101.6 x 91.4 cm. Courtesy the estate of Jane Freilicher and Paul Kasmin Gallery.